business

Jonathon Fite: Momentum investing reigns (for now)
Archived

Last month this column briefly referenced that today's tech boom companies, in comparison with traditional "value plays," are more expensive than they were during the peak of the dot-com boom. This is a pretty bold claim and warrants further discussion. 

Bank of America's investment management arm, Merrill Lynch, publishes a periodic review of U.S. growth stocks versus the universe of value stocks in the marketplace. 

Growth stocks tend to be characterized by companies with strong revenue growth, even if profits are thin or nonexistent. In today's market, investors have bid these companies up to nosebleed...

UNT reaching out to community to offer free help to local business owners
Archived

The University of North Texas Department of Management is hoping a new initiative can better foster partnerships with local businesses.

Through its Family Business Initiative, the school’s business program will offer free services to help Denton-area businesses expand and, in turn, give UNT students hands-on learning opportunities. 

The upcoming Family Business Breakfast Oct. 27 will serve as a networking event bringing together local business owners and UNT faculty and MBA students, according to the university.

“...

UNT's music business program ranked by Billboard magazine
Archived

Music magazine Billboard named the University of North Texas's music business program one of the top 15 in the country.

The list, which does not rank the 15 schools included, states UNT's College of Music earned a slot because of the new focus on entrepreneurship in music. The program, which launched last year, offers new internships, guest speakers and bi-weekly music entrepreneurship department lectures.

UNT is featured alongside Berklee College of Music, New York University Tisch School of the Arts and the Herb Alpert School of Music at University of California Los Angeles.

Business Clients Put UNT Student Consultants to the Test
Archived

Tue, Jun 14, 2016

The idea came to Michael Ingle at 3 a.m. as he lay on his bare mattress waiting for his sheets to dry after a late night of laundry.

Consumed with thoughts of invisible filth — mattresses can contain more than 100,000 dust mites and bed bugs can live for months without feeding — Ingle turned the problem with no solution into a 15-minute mattress sanitizing company dubbed Clean Sleep.

He eventually pitched his idea to investors on the reality TV show, Shark Tank. The business tycoons on the show liked the concept, but criticized the Flower Mound-based company for its...

Women at Work
Archived

Mon, Jun 13, 2016

The full story, that includes UNT Alumnae, Lori Ann Fowler and Megan Henderson, can be found here.